Social Entrepreneurship & Education Consortium Workshop 2009 Sharing Results part 1

This video presentation is part 1 of 4 videos sharing results from entire program discussion on social entrepreneurship in education. The Social Entrepreneur…
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SIT Graduate Institute: Degrees for Social Change

SIT Graduate Institute has been a beacon for social change for nearly 40 years. SIT features the following Masters degrees in the following social change and…
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This is the VOA Special English Economics Report from http://voaspecialenglish.com | http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish Small business entrepreneurs play…
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Social Entrepreneurship in the Liberal Arts

Jon Isham, professor of economics and director of the Middlebury College Center for Social Entrepreneurship, talks about the trend toward social entrepreneur…
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Recognizing the best of a new generation of America’s nonprofit leaders. Since its founding, the United States has been characterized by its vibrant civil so…

Harvard Lecturer on Sociology Gordon Bloom moderated this discussion on “The Next Generation of Social Entrepreneurship” with panelists Bill Drayton, CEO and…
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Ashoka U 2011 Social Entrepreneurship Education Innovation Awards: Panel Discussion.
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The winners of the eighth annual YouthBridge Social Enterprise and Innovation Competition (SEIC) and its $164,000 in awards have been announced.

Mary Butkus

Sister Joan Kuester (left), executive director of the Daughters of Charity Foundation, and Jill McGuire (right), executive director of the Regional Arts Commission of St. Louis, talk with Jessica Hentoff of the Circus Harmony Flying Trapeze Center. Hentoff won $30,000 from each organization.

Winning teams represented community and Washington University in St. Louis social entrepreneurs. Their social venture ideas ranged widely, covering youth, teens, homelessness and collaboration among all types of social enterprises.

“This year’s social entrepreneurs came up with lots of ideas and concepts that were new and fresh for St. Louis,” said Ken Harrington, director of the Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at WUSTL.

“All the finalists will have high impact on our community as they move forward,” he said. “We are particularly excited about how past and current competitors are collaborating to build a community culture supporting social entrepreneurship. These are exciting times in St. Louis.”

Harrington announced the following awards April 10, selected from a pool of seven finalists:

  • The YouthBridge Community Foundation award of $35,000 to Independent Youth , a nonprofit organization that educates teens on entrepreneurship by offering unique programs and resources.
  • Daughters of Charity Foundation of St. Louis award of $30,000 and the Regional Arts Commission award of $30,000 to Circus Harmony Flying Trapeze Center , where men, women and children will be able to increase confidence and life skills using circus performance experiences.
  • The Lutheran Foundation of St. Louis award of $25,000 to ArchCity Defenders Inc. , a nonprofit legal organization that works with numerous social services groups to provide comprehensive criminal and civic legal services for homeless and other disadvantaged people.
  • The Skandalaris Award of $25,000 to GoodMap , an easy-to-use website where social agencies can collaborate to achieve greater impact including helping people find, organize and share information about community resources.
  • In addition, awards were given for the best score for measuring social value and best venture supported by students.

Law firm and Skandalaris sponsor Polsinelli Shughart will provide up to three $3,000 prizes of in-kind legal services to teams in this year’s competition.

The YouthBridge SEIC started in 2005 as a partnership between the Skandalaris Center and the YouthBridge Community Foundation. Since its inception, the competition has awarded more than $1 million in cash and in-kind prizes to 36 social ventures, including an annual $5,000 student prize. More than 85 percent of ventures that have won awards still are operating.

The YouthBridge Community Foundation partners with donors to help charities, especially those focused on children, become financially sound through leadership, grants and donor services.

The Skandalaris Center is a cross-campus and communitywide initiative serving students in all schools and degree programs at the university and the St. Louis region. Sponsors of the Skandalaris Center include RubinBrown, the Regional Chamber, Polsinelli Shughart and Lopata, Flegel Company.

Article source: http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/25260.aspx

Makaela Kingsley

Makaela Kingsley will become director of the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship.

Makaela (Steinberg) Kingsley graduated from Wesleyan in 1998 with a degree in neuroscience and behavior. After a brief stint doing public relations for the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts, she returned to Wesleyan in 2000 to join the alumni and parent relations team in University Relations.

During the past 13 years, she has collaborated with colleagues in U.R. and across campus, as well as students and alumni. For the past two months, she has been serving as interim director of the Patricelli Center.

Her short-term goal is to expand Patricelli’s existing services and offer top-notch, high-impact workshops and trainings, networking and advising services, and grant administration. Looking to the future, Kingsley will explore additional ways to support students, in particular through faculty and academic engagement and research.

“My personal commitment to social innovation and human rights combined with my experience as a Wesleyan student, alumna, and staff member drew me to the Patricelli Center,” Kingsley said. “I am thrilled to have this opportunity to support Wesleyan students and alumni interested in creating and sustaining programs, businesses, and organizations that advance the public good. Through our workshops, networking, and grants, the Patricelli Center will cultivate and strengthen the spirit of social entrepreneurship and civic engagement that is already deeply ingrained in the Wesleyan culture.”

Article source: http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2013/04/22/kingsleypatricelli/

The winners of the eighth annual YouthBridge Social Enterprise and Innovation Competition (SEIC) and its $164,000 in awards have been announced.

Mary Butkus

Sister Joan Kuester (left), executive director of the Daughters of Charity Foundation, and Jill McGuire (right), executive director of the Regional Arts Commission of St. Louis, talk with Jessica Hentoff of the Circus Harmony Flying Trapeze Center. Hentoff won $30,000 from each organization.

Winning teams represented community and Washington University in St. Louis social entrepreneurs. Their social venture ideas ranged widely, covering youth, teens, homelessness and collaboration among all types of social enterprises.

“This year’s social entrepreneurs came up with lots of ideas and concepts that were new and fresh for St. Louis,” said Ken Harrington, director of the Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at WUSTL.

“All the finalists will have high impact on our community as they move forward,” he said. “We are particularly excited about how past and current competitors are collaborating to build a community culture supporting social entrepreneurship. These are exciting times in St. Louis.”

Harrington announced the following awards April 10, selected from a pool of seven finalists:

  • The YouthBridge Community Foundation award of $35,000 to Independent Youth , a nonprofit organization that educates teens on entrepreneurship by offering unique programs and resources.
  • Daughters of Charity Foundation of St. Louis award of $30,000 and the Regional Arts Commission award of $30,000 to Circus Harmony Flying Trapeze Center , where men, women and children will be able to increase confidence and life skills using circus performance experiences.
  • The Lutheran Foundation of St. Louis award of $25,000 to ArchCity Defenders Inc. , a nonprofit legal organization that works with numerous social services groups to provide comprehensive criminal and civic legal services for homeless and other disadvantaged people.
  • The Skandalaris Award of $25,000 to GoodMap , an easy-to-use website where social agencies can collaborate to achieve greater impact including helping people find, organize and share information about community resources.
  • In addition, awards were given for the best score for measuring social value and best venture supported by students.

Law firm and Skandalaris sponsor Polsinelli Shughart will provide up to three $3,000 prizes of in-kind legal services to teams in this year’s competition.

The YouthBridge SEIC started in 2005 as a partnership between the Skandalaris Center and the YouthBridge Community Foundation. Since its inception, the competition has awarded more than $1 million in cash and in-kind prizes to 36 social ventures, including an annual $5,000 student prize. More than 85 percent of ventures that have won awards still are operating.

The YouthBridge Community Foundation partners with donors to help charities, especially those focused on children, become financially sound through leadership, grants and donor services.

The Skandalaris Center is a cross-campus and communitywide initiative serving students in all schools and degree programs at the university and the St. Louis region. Sponsors of the Skandalaris Center include RubinBrown, the Regional Chamber, Polsinelli Shughart and Lopata, Flegel Company.

Many of the boldest experiments in higher education these days are led by a relatively new kind of business leader: the social entrepreneur. The founders of Coursera proudly claim the label, stressing their lack of concern about a business plan as they set up free online courses from top colleges.

This is an article from The Chronicle of Higher Education , Americas leading higher education publication. It is presented here under an agreement with University World News .

So does the head of Udacity, another provider of MOOCs, or massive open online courses. In fact, it’s hard to find any chief executives of education start-ups these days who don’t drop social entrepreneur into their bios, as they stress that they are not your typical money-grubbing suits.

But other than a promise to do good, being a social entrepreneur in higher education appears to have no strict meaning, at least to the lawyer or the tax man. It is a state of mind: an optimistic belief that if you change the world, money will follow.

It is also a commentary on what the new entrepreneurs see as the slow pace of change at non-profits that traditional colleges and foundations move too slowly to make big innovations happen without a push.

Daphne Koller, the 44-year-old co-founder of Coursera, embodies this new ethos. Most of her career was spent on scholarship, as a Stanford University professor of computer science and winner of a MacArthur genius grant.

She says that she took a pay cut to start the company, and that its mission is to solve the problem of unequal access to high-quality education. To show she’s not about the money, she boasts that Coursera skipped the usual market research done by old-fashioned companies.

In every decision the company makes, she says, the first question is, “Is this in the best interest of our students?”

For instance, Coursera has rejected the idea of selling advertising on its Web site, Ms Koller says. Ads might bring a lucrative income stream, but they would be a “distraction” to students.

Yet there’s nothing on paper that guarantees these student-centric operating procedures. Despite the .org in its web address, Coursera is a standard C Corporation, whose charter is to return profits to the investors, who have given more than US$22 million to start the venture.

Koller and the company’s other founder, Andrew Ng, could have made their venture a nonprofit. And they considered that route, Ng told me in an interview last year.

But when they were starting out a couple of years ago, he said, they found it “really tough” to raise money from foundations. “It turns out that we’re able to find resources much more easily as a company than as a nonprofit,” he said.

They even looked into setting up as a benefit corporation a structure that makes clear to investors that the company will focus on social good as well as profits. But the state of Delaware, where Coursera (and just about every other Silicon Valley start-up) is incorporated, doesn’t offer that option.

As I continued to ask for proof that Coursera would be less profit-focused than any other company, Koller pushed back and turned the question around, asking why people assume that nonprofits are somehow purer than a well-meaning company.

“I just read the Time magazine article about non-profit hospitals charging egregious amounts for Band-Aids,” she said. “Does that mean that they’re doing the right thing by their patients? I would argue against that claim.

“It comes down to who’s running it and what their intent is,” she concluded. “Andrew and I are running this, and we’re running this with the best of intentions.”

More contradictions

Social entrepreneurs in higher education also present another contradiction: Companies like Coursera need old-fashioned universities to be their partners but are also pushing disruptive changes that could threaten, as a side effect, traditional revenue streams of those same partners.

In other cases, the companies seek to change the way colleges do business rather than to simply sell to what colleges already do.

“If you want to create real change, you have to be willing to challenge your customer and question their beliefs,” explains another self-described social entrepreneur, Brian Sowards, the 32-year-old founder of a start-up called Useed.

His company helps colleges run fundraising campaigns for individual projects proposed by students. It’s similar in spirit to Kickstarter, the popular crowdfunding site, through which strangers are asked to make small contributions to support projects. It’s a different approach than asking alumni to donate to a main college fund that the institution can spend on whatever it wants.

Sowards says that his mission is to help students become more entrepreneurial as they raise money for their projects.

He said the company has already turned down gigs that didn’t advance that mission. “We were invited to help study-abroad trip companies to create crowdfunding pages for people to go on their trips,” he said. As a revenue-generator, it seemed a sure bet.

“What it wouldn’t do is transform education,” he said. So they said no.

At least one longtime college-technology leader, Martin Ringle of Reed College, looks at some of the new pitches from social entrepreneurs with “fascination,” especially those promoting free courses.

“They’re saying, ‘Hey, you guys have to get on board with this whole new wave of things’,” he says. Yet the new wave of things is “trying to undermine and disrupt and ultimately do away with” the people they are selling to. “Many of these entrepreneurs are essentially playing both sides of the street.”

Some young leaders of start-up companies in higher education, though, argue that they are simply behaving in the disruptive spirit they were taught by the universities they are selling to.

“This generation of entrepreneurs were actually raised very idealist,” says Michael Staton, a 32-year-old who founded a company called Inigral several years ago. “I always felt that I was getting sold this idea that I could change the world as far as back as I could remember.”

Staton says his alma mater , Clark University, which uses the slogan “challenge convention, change our world,” has declined to try Inigral, which helps colleges improve enrolment through a Facebook application. “I would probably give it to them,” he says.

Indiana Jones vs Han Solo

While the term social entrepreneur has been around for decades, it seems to have emerged within higher education only in the past few years.

An organisation called Ashoka, for instance, has been promoting the idea since the 1980s, but it only set up a programme focused on higher education in 2008. The group has primarily applied the term social entrepreneurship to people starting nonprofits who want to borrow practices from the business world to make their efforts more innovative and sustainable.

Ashoka does sometimes support founders of for-profit efforts, but only if “the social mission is their main driver,” and the for-profit structure is just “the best way to realise its intended social impact,” says Michle Leaman, a director at the organisation. “Selling water and donating 5% of profits; that’s not really social entrepreneurship for us.”

In Hollywood terms, Indiana Jones might call himself a social entrepreneur. But not Han Solo, who claimed he saved Princess Leia only for the reward.

But Leaman admits that some companies misuse the label. “The term is really muddled,” she notes.

Many professors watching their colleges work with Coursera or try other products made by social entrepreneurs say they are sceptical of companies, fearing that the talk of social good is a way to try to distract from the profit the companies stand to make.

“It’s a kind of whitewashing of what they’re doing, which is to make money off education,” says George Williams, an associate professor of English at the University of South Carolina Upstate and an editor of the ProfHacker blog hosted by The Chronicle.

Yet Ringle, of Reed College, admits that he would rather work with companies who talk about doing good than ones who don’t bother making that pitch.

“I like hearing this rhetoric and would love to see these folks essentially carry through on it and be successful,” he says. He praised Google, which was founded with the informal corporate motto of “don’t be evil,” for its Apps for Education program, which offers free email services to colleges, arguing that it has changed the behavior of Microsoft and other competitors.

There are other technology companies that have passed up profits to fulfil a broader social mission. One example cited frequently by social entrepreneurs is Craigslist, an example that Ng said is an inspiration to Coursera.

I got the chance to talk with Craigslist’s founder, Craig Newmark, during the recent South By Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin, and I asked him what advice he had for the many social entrepreneurs in education.

He said that he went through a time when bankers and venture-capital firms were offering him “a big huge pile of money” for a stake. He passed, to keep almost everything on Craigslist free (the site does charge small amounts for some job postings).

“If you do something successful, bankers and VCs will be all too happy to give you a huge amount of money to do things the usual way,” he concluded. “But if you know when enough is enough, you can do something unique.”

Article source: http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20130420090052530






CORAL GABLES, Fla. , April 19, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — New ventures including a boat shoe seller, a health care provider and a social entrepreneurship program built around a café have taken top honors in the University of Miami ‘s 2013 Business Plan Competition, hosted by the university’s School of Business Administration . The competition winners, honored in an awards ceremony April 19 , took home a combined total of $30,000 in first, second, third and other prizes.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110906/DC62866LOGO )

Jason Shuman won the Grand Prize and $5,000 in the undergraduate student category for Category 5 Boat Shoes , a shoe wholesale, retailer and e-commerce site that provides logo customization on shoes. In the graduate student category, Rimsky Denis, Karan Srivastava , Onyi Ugorji , and Chaitanya Vadlamudi  took home the Grand Prize and $5,000 for their venture, S.H.H.A.D.E , which helps solve the problem of emergency room overutilization by bringing health care providers directly to patients in their homes. And in the UM alumni category, Sandi Vidal won the Grand Prize and $5,000 for Savory Community Café, a café and social entrepreneurship program that provides employment and teaches soft and transferable skills to job seekers.

“I love seeing young entrepreneurs executing on their business models and driving revenue while they are still students,” said PT United founder Quinn Worden , who returned as a competition judge one year after he won first place in the contest as a UM School of Business senior. “They’re really executing.  It has to be more than an idea, it has to be an opportunity you can really execute on and that’s what we’ve seen in this competition.”

Second Place in the undergraduate category and $2,500 went to Lisa Weintraub for Sol Food, an organic and sustainable tapas bar that promotes not only a commitment to the body, but also to the environment. Second Place in the graduate category and $2,500 went to Stephen Spiegel and Juan Barrera for CrewHu, an online platform that helps businesses create, execute and track contests in order to motivate and retain employees. Second Place in the alumni category and $2,500 went to Obediah Ben Samuel for Luxshare Luxury Car Share, an online peer-to-peer automotive rental marketplace focused exclusively on luxury and exotic car brands.

There was a tie for Third Place in the undergraduate category with $1,000 going to Ana Gil , Lili Qiu and Shuai Wang for uTextBook Exchange, an online textbook selling service for U.S. college students; and another $1,000 going to Parker Barnett for Huah.co, an online service that allows users to search for and book fitness instructors, classes and sessions at gyms. Third Place and $1,000 in the graduate category went to Whitney Kimmel and Alexander Shapiro for KOLYR, a Miami -based lifestyle company that allows consumers to express their passions through color with versatile, lightweight unisex footwear; while Third Place and $1,000 in the alumni category went to Stanley Satz for Advanced Imaging Projects, a pioneer in first-in-class theranostics for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

“Some of these companies are already up and running and winning gives them the extra capital they need to scale their businesses,” said Susana Alvarez , interim director of entrepreneurship programs at the UM School of Business. “We saw a remarkable improvement from the moment they submitted their concept papers to the final presentations, which shows the value that mentors provide,” said Alvarez, noting that in January the entrepreneurs were partnered with South Florida industry mentors to help them develop their plans.

In addition to the undergraduate, graduate and alumni category prizes, the Paul K. Sugrue Entrepreneurial Spirit Award and $1,000 was presented to graduate students Chad Brick , Joshua Banner , Joseph Coconate , Caroline Ferris , Oscar Harada , and Ryan Keller . The prize is presented annually to the team that has demonstrated the highest spirit of entrepreneurship. The five semifinalist teams that did not place each received $500 in prize money.

The Business Plan Competition started last fall when 66 concept papers were submitted to the judging committee. Ultimately 15 semifinalists were selected to present to the judges April 18 , with the winners named the following day. The judges included a dozen successful entrepreneurs and venture capitalists from South Florida and across the country.

Now in its 11th year, the Business Plan Competition is open to all University of Miami students and alumni. Past winners in the competition have gone on to build their ventures into businesses that have garnered national attention. They include such companies as College Hunks Hauling Junk and My Therapy Journal.com , both of which have been featured on ABC Television’s “ Shark Tank ,” a reality program in which entrepreneurs share their business ideas with a group of five self-made millionaires in hopes of getting venture capital to help them attain similar levels of success.

SOURCE University of Miami School of Business Administration

RELATED LINKS
http://www.bus.miami.edu

Article source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/university-of-miami-school-of-business-awards-30000-in-annual-business-plan-competition-203815541.html

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